AT: Bear Mountain State Park to Fahnestock State Park

This past weekend was a beautiful one for hiking! Bright blue skies without a hint of rain. Birch and I took an Uber from Canopus Lake to the Bear Mountain Inn and began hiking north by around 9 am. Unfortunately, the famous section of the AT through the zoo was not open, so we took the blue trail and crossed the bridge over the Hudson. After a short hike along NY-9D, we began our steepest ascent of the trip, up about 1000 ft to a peak known as “Anthony’s Nose” (supposedly named after a pre-revolutionary war sea captain).

Along the way, we ran into “Marmot”, a 70-year-old women who had thru hiked the AT about 30 years ago, and was now completing the north half of the trail, having done the south half last year. Marmot was enthusiastic and tenacious and was a great reminder that anything is possible.

Although the map shows many loop trails along the way, I really didn’t see them until we got to about 1 1/2 miles from the Graymoor Center. We crossed US 9 by a convenience store then quickly made our way to the Graymoor ballfield where we set up camp. The ballfield included plenty of picnic tables, water on tap, and even a shower. We settled in and relaxed, having the entire afternoon to read and enjoy the weather. Although we had heard that the center’s bells were loud, we actually enjoyed listening to them during the afternoon. We didn’t hear them at all at night.

In the morning, we awoke to quite a few more tents set up in the area. No one seemed particularly outgoing or friendly at 6 am so we quietly ate breakfast, broke camp, and got on the trail.

Our second day was much hotter than the first. Although there was not much elevation, we were sweating in no time.

The hike from the Graymoor to Canopus Lake felt like walking through a time machine. Old stone walls, the remnants of Revolutionary War era homesteads, seems to be everywhere. At one point we passed a plaque that marked where George Washington had inoculated troops against small pox. (Who knew that inoculations were possible then?!?)

It was at about this point that Birch and I hit a big milestone – our 1,000th mile on the AT! We were so excited! A hiker named “Digs” took our photo and gave us a fist bump, sending us on our way. We still needed to complete another 5 miles to get to our car.

We filled up with water at a pump station. The ascent to the Three Lakes Trail should have been super easy but the 90+ degree weather was a killer. We really had to take our time! The last two miles were very easy and we arrived at our car tired, but happy with our accomplishment.

AT: NY-17 to Bear Mountain Inn

Day One: NY-17 to William Brien Memorial Shelter

On Friday evening, May 14, Maple and I arrived at Bear Mountain Inn, on the west side of the Hudson River, New York. We were booked to stay in the Overlook Lodge. It’s a beautiful Inn, and our stay would have been perfect had it not been for a large group of boys who were loud until midnight. Still, the front desk clerk gave us a generous refund for the disturbance, so I really can’t complain.6-14_1553

Maple and I had a good breakfast at the 1915 Restaurant, and were, afterwards, picked up by Jossie’s Shuttle, and once again Richard, Jossie’s husband, was right on time. We were on the trail by 8:20 in the morning.

In about an hour we arrived at the “Lemon Squeezer,” where the AT passes through a narrow crevice between two boulders. Managing one’s backpack is the only real difficulty here. Almost anyone can skirt sideways and upward through the “Lemon Squeezer,” but if one has a large and heavy backpack, lifting it up sideways with one arm can prove challenging. The key is to get one’s backpack up onto the flat ledge above oneself as quickly as possible.

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The AT, as it traverses Harriman State Park, is not at all difficult. There is, however, a lot of flat rock, which may be slippery when wet. Maple and I saw a group of older ladies and a group of young girls hiking the path. Moreover, in mid-June, the Mountain Laurel is in bloom, and the fern is at its peak. It’s really quite a beautiful park.

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Our destination for the night, the William Brien Memorial Shelter, does not have a very appealing water source. The spring-fed well there is described by some as stagnant and covered with leaves. Therefore, Maple and I decided to fill up at the stream that is just before Seven Lakes Parkway, which feeds into Lake Nawahunta. There was a large rock in the middle of the stream, where we could sit and pump our water through the filter. We use the Katahdin Hiker Pro. Unfortunately, halfway through the process, the filter clogged, making the pump impossible to use. We spent an hour at the stream, attempting to unclog our filter. (This is the second or third time we’ve had this problem.) We were forced to accept the amount of water we had, though it required that we conserve.

We reached the shelter at about 3:00, set up camp, prepared ourselves a cup of coffee, and relaxed for awhile, prior to making dinner. The tent spaces at the shelter are nicely separated, and the area is quite beautiful. Maple and I enjoyed our stay here. We retired early, and slept well, but were awoken by the rain that fell at scattered intervals throughout the night.

Day Two: William Brien Memorial Shelter to Bear Mountain Inn.

Rain was forecast throughout the next day, but we were quite lucky. Although we had some sprinkles, it did not start raining in earnest until we were most of the way down Bear Mountain. Nevertheless, anticipating constant rain, but finding ourselves in a dry interval, Maple and I got up early and were on the trail by 6:45.

We had three mountains to traverse this day: Black Mountain, West Mountain, and Bear Mountain. It would be a day of significant ups and downs. The phenomenon that really made this day interesting was the rock stairs. I believe that these are created over billions of years, through processes of geological layering and erosion. Not only are they evidence of divine design, but they make hiking much easier. As Maple says, they are proof of God’s love for hikers and that he wants people to hike. We encountered rock stairs on all three mountains, but especially on Bear Mountain. Of course, I am aware of the argument that these stairs are of human design, but the incredible amount of physical exertion required to build such stairs is entirely foreign to human nature, which is fundamentally lazy; therefore, I stick to my belief.

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Maple and I got a good view of Perkins Memorial Tower from West Mountain. Maple said that it looked to be twenty miles away. Fortunately, it wasn’t. We arrived at the tower just before noon. This was Father’s Day, and the top of Bear Mountain, as well as the bottom (at Bear Mountain Inn) was crowded. From the top of Bear Mountain to the bottom the AT was graded and graveled, so it was really quite easy, though a little hard on the knees, going down.

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We arrived at the Inn soaking wet and thirsty, but after changing into dry clothes in the restrooms, Maple and I rehydrated ourselves at the Hiker’s Coffee Shop. We high-fived our backpacking success, and were soon on our way home.

AT: NY-17A to NY-17

After spending the night in a hotel in Secaucus, New Jersey, Maple and I made our way on Saturday morning, April 20, to the Elk Pen Hiker’s Lot on the outskirts of Harriman State Park, New York. The weather report had called for torrential rains, so we put on our rain gear and waited for Josie’s Shuttle. Soon, a man pulled up behind us, and announced that he was Josie. His voice didn’t match the Josie I had spoken with on the phone, but we got in anyway. His name turned out to be Richard, and he was a pleasant gentleman, who charged a very reasonable rate.

Richard dropped us off at NY-17A, and our hike began. Soon we reached the Pinnacles and, afterwards, Cat Rocks, both obstacles requiring scrambling over wet, slippery, and treacherous rocks. 4-20-1046Maple and I took our time, as we knew we had all day to make it to Wildcat Shelter. Still, I slipped and landed hard on my butt. We both crab walked more than once down moss-covered inclines. We could see the blue (safe) trail that skirted around the Pinnacles and Cat Rocks, but Maple and I are committed to the white blazes. Is that rational? Probably not, but it lets us say with pride that we are AT purists.

Soon after Cat Rocks, we made it to the shelter. After getting out of our wet clothes, we prepared our lunch, made ourselves coffee, and then, . . . when it looked like the rain would hold off a bit, we set up our tent and took a nap. When we arose, the tent was soaking wet, and several other hikers had showed up.

We introduced ourselves and found that one young man was a trail runner, who had covered over 40 miles that day northbound. That stretched my imagination to the breaking point, since the terrain he had covered was far from smooth. There were bogs to navigate, rocks to scramble over, and brooks to cross. Even so, I see that Jennifer Pharr Davis, according to her 2008 Itinerary, achieved the same mileage over this territory. I’m simply amazed!

We arose early the following morning, Easter Sunday, and were the first to depart from the shelter. Soon, we reached Fitzgerald Falls, paused to take photos of this beautiful area, and then proceeded, crossing the stream twice over rocks. During the first 5 miles we made great time, covering 2 miles per hour. But then we ran into a series of mountains, each requiring cautious scrambling.4-21_0841

To slow us down even further, biting gnats were out in force, not only biting, but flying into our mouths, our eyes, our noses, and our ears. When we needed most to concentrate on our footing, they seemed most bent on distracting us. It was maddening! Maple was attacked relentlessly, and after our hike needed medical attention for the swelling that ensued.

Just beyond East Mombasha Rd., there is a stream that runs into Little Dam Lake. When we reached it, I had a few choice words to express myself, for there was no bridge to cross or rocks to traverse. Maple and I had no choice but to ford it, and we could not see the bottom. Just then, it started raining again. I figured we would get soaked anyway, so we might as well go in with boots and pants. Maple practically dived in to the challenge. Before she was across, I followed. I’m 5’10”, and the water was just up a ways from my crotch. It was up to Maple’s waist. I forgot that I had our camera in my pants pocket. It was ruined, but fortunately the photo card was salvageable.4-21_1117

Just for the record, there is a beautiful camping area on the north side of this stream. Maple and I were exhausted at this point, but pressed on.

Our next obstacle was Arden Mountain, from the top of which we could clearly see NY-17 and the Elk Pen Hiker’s Lot. The descent from this mountain was more difficult and treacherous than the ascent. Still, we made it down safely and back to our car.

Altogether, this was one of the more difficult AT sections that we have hiked. It was quite an adventure!

AT: NJ 94 Vernon to NY 17a. Belvale, NY

This past weekend Birch and I went backpacking so that we could finish the New Jersey portion of the Appalachian Trail. Getting to NJ 94 wasn’t easy. There were very few shuttle options from our drop off point to the trail head. For this reason, we had to settle for a taxi service with a late pick up time.

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As we waited for the taxi the wind began to blow and the flurries began to fly. This was not going to be a warm weekend! The first part of the trail is known as the “stairway to heaven”. It is a short (1.4 mile) but steep ascent up Wawayanda Mountain that is fortunate to have many sets of stairs that make the hike interesting. There were a ton of day hikers who went up to enjoy the beautiful views. We, however, had mileage to make!

Unfortunately, our late start and the early sunset made it impossible to get to Wawayanda Shelter as we had hoped. Instead, we filled up with water at a stream just south of Barrett Road, crossed Barrett Road, made our way into the woods, and resigned ourselves to setting up camp. The sun was low, so we only had time for a cup of coffee and a cold sandwich before hitting the sack.

In the morning, we quickly made our way past Wawayanda Shelter and through a beautiful wooded area. After lunch, we began our climb up to the ridge. This included several places where I had to scramble and one area that had a very cool ladder that took us up to the ridge and across Prospect Rock to the highest point on the AT in New York. Again, we saw some day hikers who had come up to the area from a side trail. Once on the ridge we came to the New Jersey – New York state line. Another state complete!

This section of the New Jersey/ New York AT was surprisingly challenging. Although there is very little change in elevation, the ridge requires lots of short climbs, up and down, over a series of rocks. This slowed us down considerably! Another challenge was that the leaves had recently fallen on the trail, making following the trail very difficult at times. Thank goodness for the great job that the New York New Jersey Trail Conference did with its blazes. It saved us!

Instead of making up time from the previous day, we resigned ourselves to stopping short of the next shelter.  Given our time constraints, we agreed to end our hike at New York 17a the next day.  Weather throughout our trip was cold. After a warm dinner we tucked ourselves in for the night and when we awoke our water bottles were frozen. However, we had plenty of warm weather clothing, sleeping bag liners, and other gear that made us able to enjoy the trip despite the cool temps. The last day we had a very short hike to make it to our destination. Once off the ridge, the hike was very easy. We look forward to coming back when the weather warms up a bit.